In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we cover a vast range of characters, events, and settings. Here we see The Bonus Marchers of 1932, a largely forgotten episode in American history.

From Wikipedia: “The Bonus Army was the popular name of an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups—who gathered in Washington, D.C., in the spring and summer of 1932 to demand cash-payment redemption of their service certificates. Its organizers called it the Bonus Expeditionary Force to echo the name of World War I’s American Expeditionary Force, while the media called it the Bonus March. It was led by Walter W. Waters, a former Army sergeant.

Many of the war veterans had been out of work since the beginning of the Great Depression. The World War Adjusted Compensation Act of 1924 had awarded them bonuses in the form of certificates they could not redeem until 1945. Each service certificate, issued to a qualified veteran soldier, bore a face value equal to the soldier’s promised payment plus compound interest. The principal demand of the Bonus Army was the immediate cash payment of their certificates.”

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Marchers)

Shown are pages 87-88 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645 In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we cover a vast range of characters, events, and settings. Here we see The Bonus Marchers of 1932, a largely forgotten episode in American history.

From Wikipedia: “The Bonus Army was the popular name of an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups—who gathered in Washington, D.C., in the spring and summer of 1932 to demand cash-payment redemption of their service certificates. Its organizers called it the Bonus Expeditionary Force to echo the name of World War I’s American Expeditionary Force, while the media called it the Bonus March. It was led by Walter W. Waters, a former Army sergeant.

Many of the war veterans had been out of work since the beginning of the Great Depression. The World War Adjusted Compensation Act of 1924 had awarded them bonuses in the form of certificates they could not redeem until 1945. Each service certificate, issued to a qualified veteran soldier, bore a face value equal to the soldier’s promised payment plus compound interest. The principal demand of the Bonus Army was the immediate cash payment of their certificates.”

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Marchers)

Shown are pages 87-88 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we cover a vast range of characters, events, and settings. Here we see The Bonus Marchers of 1932, a largely forgotten episode in American history.

From Wikipedia: “The Bonus Army was the popular name of an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups—who gathered in Washington, D.C., in the spring and summer of 1932 to demand cash-payment redemption of their service certificates. Its organizers called it the Bonus Expeditionary Force to echo the name of World War I’s American Expeditionary Force, while the media called it the Bonus March. It was led by Walter W. Waters, a former Army sergeant.

Many of the war veterans had been out of work since the beginning of the Great Depression. The World War Adjusted Compensation Act of 1924 had awarded them bonuses in the form of certificates they could not redeem until 1945. Each service certificate, issued to a qualified veteran soldier, bore a face value equal to the soldier’s promised payment plus compound interest. The principal demand of the Bonus Army was the immediate cash payment of their certificates.”

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Marchers)

Shown are pages 87-88 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we cover a vast range of characters, events, and settings. Here we see the Wilson Dam at Muscle Shoals, an amazing feat of engineering.

(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson_Dam)

Shown is page 57 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we present, in cartoonized form, a different version of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ really was—different than that popularized by Franklin Roosevelt. The original version, seen above, was proposed by William Graham Sumner; and this Forgotten Man was the working man, the ordinary man, from who income was redistributed without any real say in the matter…


For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645 In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we present, in cartoonized form, a different version of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ really was—different than that popularized by Franklin Roosevelt. The original version, seen above, was proposed by William Graham Sumner; and this Forgotten Man was the working man, the ordinary man, from who income was redistributed without any real say in the matter…


For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

In the course of our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we present, in cartoonized form, a different version of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ really was—different than that popularized by Franklin Roosevelt. The original version, seen above, was proposed by William Graham Sumner; and this Forgotten Man was the working man, the ordinary man, from who income was redistributed without any real say in the matter…

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

Our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, depicts the landslide re-election of President Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. As part of this we see Wendell Willkie examining a popular newspaper cartoon of the time, which represented Roosevelt’s formulation of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ was.

Shown above are pages 211 and 212 of 294 pages.


For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645 Our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, depicts the landslide re-election of President Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. As part of this we see Wendell Willkie examining a popular newspaper cartoon of the time, which represented Roosevelt’s formulation of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ was.

Shown above are pages 211 and 212 of 294 pages.


For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

Our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, depicts the landslide re-election of President Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. As part of this we see Wendell Willkie examining a popular newspaper cartoon of the time, which represented Roosevelt’s formulation of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ was.

Shown above are pages 211 and 212 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

Our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression” discusses the two different versions of WHO exactly is ‘The Forgotten Man’—a question still relevant to this day, since there is still raging debate about the differing points of view represented by these two distinct Forgotten Men. Above, we see President Franklin Roosevelt lay out, in a famous radio speech, his version of the Forgotten Man.

Shown is page 85 of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

Throughout our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, we discuss the two different versions of who ‘The Forgotten Man’ was. One version was popularized by President Roosevelt, as mentioned above, in a famous speech; the other, original version created by William Graham Sumner, as mentioned above by Wendell Willkie, was…largely forgotten, or overwritten, by Roosevelt’s version.

Shown above is page 8, of 294 pages.

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645

Our graphic novel edition of Amity Shlaes’ bestseller, “The Forgotten Man, A New History of the Great Depression”, takes place during a time of great suffering. It was the era of President Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs, which were supposed to relieve the suffering and improve the economy.

Shown above is a two-page spread, pages 6-7 of 294.

For more information about our book, and to pre-order, please see: http://www.amazon.com/The-Forgotten-Man-Graphic-Edition/dp/0061967645